2015: What a Year for Turpin and For Our Clients!

January 6, 2016 in News, Posts for Buyers, Talent Development, The Orderly Conversation, Training

Happy New Year!We hope the New Year is off to a good start for you. Before we get too far into 2016, we want to say thanks for making 2015 such a good one for Turpin. We had a lot of client wins, and we’d like to share a few because you might be able to take advantage of them yourself. [Tweet “Thanks for making 2015 such a good year”]

Since Dale and Greg launched The Orderly Conversation in 2014, several clients have asked us to develop highly-tailored sessions to meet their specific business goals. We’ve always tailored our workshops to meet specific needs, but now we’ve made it easier for you to imagine how we can help you meet your goals using the methodologies laid out in the book. The result of this work is more than 20 new outcome-specific workshops focusing on different aspects of business communication. Each falls into one of three categories:

  • Training for Presenters
  • Training for Meeting Facilitators
  • Training for Trainers and Subject Matter Experts

A few examples include:

  • Presenting to leadership & exuding executive presence
  • Speaking at conferences
  • Closing the deal during sales meetings
  • Fostering team collaboration from a distance
  • Working with SMEs in the training room

If you go to our main website (www.turpincommunication.com) and roll your mouse over the navigation, you will be able to see the entire catalog.

Also in 2015, Dale focused a lot of energy on executive coaching, working 1-1 with several very smart people to prepare them for high-stakes presentations, and Greg began delivering keynote addresses at conferences, which does a lot to broaden our reach and improve communication across a wide range of client situations.

Finally, there were a couple big milestones this year—Sarah celebrated 10 years with Turpin and Greg rang in his 20th!

Have a great January! All of us at Turpin look forward to the opportunity of working with you in 2016.

Dale, Greg, and the entire Turpin Communication Team

Introducing the New Workshop Catalog by Turpin Communication

September 1, 2015 in Greg Owen-Boger, News, Posts for Buyers, Presentation, Talent Development, The Orderly Conversation, Training

At Turpin Communication, we recognize the complexity and challenges of the work our clients do. Because of this, our workshops have always been highly tailored to the unique situations they face.

Now, we’ve made it easier for you to recognize how we can help you meet your business goals.

Workshop Catalog 2015The New Workshop Catalog

We’ve broken the new workshop catalog into three categories to match the type of speakers we work with: Business Presenters, Meeting Facilitators, and Trainers. Each of those categories is further broken down to focus on a specific type of speaker or business goal. For example:

Presentation Training for Sales Professionals focuses on the practical skills it takes to facilitate high-stakes sales situations.

Presenting to Leadership and Other Decision Makers provides foundation-level training to help participants speak clearly and concisely to time-crunched executives.

Does your team need to work on their executive presence? We’ve got you covered.

Do your managers have to collaborate with virtual teams? We have support for that too.

We also have workshops designed to help new and “accidental” trainers be more effective in the training room.

Learn More

This is only a sampling of the 28 newly designed and updated workshops we now offer. We invite you to take a peek at all of our workshop titles. Then give us a call so that we can tailor training to meet the exact needs of your team.

About Turpin Communication

Turpin Communication is a distinctly different presentation and facilitation skills training company, and we’re dedicated to helping people get business done.

If you’re familiar with our work, you know that we are guided by three principles:

  1. Presentations are less like speeches and more like Orderly Conversations.
  2. Our approach preserves every presenter’s personality and natural communication style. We call it: Find your focus. Be Yourself. Only better.
  3. Business presentations succeed on two levels: (1) was the goal met? And (2), did the speaker create the conditions for a fruitful conversation to take place?

More detail about our guiding principles and how they can be applied to your work can be found on the home page of Turpin Communication.

Why Redefine Business Presentations?

July 21, 2014 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Greg Owen-Boger, The Orderly Conversation

In all of our workshops, a certain amount of unlearning has always taken place.

Over time, we realized that everything we were helping presenters unlearn came from the world of speechmaking. Although presenters knew they were not delivering formal speeches, the assumptions they made and the strategies they used didn’t reflect that. They were simply working with the wrong tools, like using the handle of a screwdriver to pound a nail into the wall. If you worked at it long enough, you might be able to do it, but why bother when there’s a hammer in the toolbox?

We should stop calling these things presentations. We should call the conversations. That's really what they are.At some point, probably during a debrief after a workshop, one of us said, “Do you think we should just stop calling these things presentations altogether? Everyone gets hung up on that word. Wouldn’t it be easier to just call them conversations? That’s really what they are.”

So that’s what we did. We redefined business presentations as Orderly Conversations.

We brought the idea that business presentations were a type of conversation, not a type of speech, into our workshops. Soon, we realized we were heading toward a major overhaul. From preparation and delivery, through managing interaction, to how you judge your success when the presentation is over—all of these things are affected when you begin with the assumption that what you’re dealing with is a conversation.

To succeed, business presenters need to make these adjustments.

Instead of…

 

You should:

rehearsing for perfection  prepare to be flexible
following the rules of delivery  engage in a genuine conversation
following a one-size-fits-all approach  adapt to your Default Approach
keeping visuals in the background  bring them into the conversation
controlling group interactions  create the conditions for a fruitful discussion

The Orderly Conversation explores how each of these adjustments are made.

The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined is available now on this website and at Amazon and Itasca Books.

New Communication Guide Offers a Game-Changing Approach to Business Presentations

April 16, 2014 in Delivery, Facilitation, News, Preparation, Presentation, Talent Development, The Orderly Conversation, Training, Uncategorized

Granville Circle Press announces the July 2014 publication of “The Orderly Conversation,” a groundbreaking resource for business presenters.

News Release – PDF

PrintGranville Circle Press announced today the publication of “The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined” by Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger, a book that promises to change the way business presenters think about the “getting-business-done” presentations they deliver. The authors, communication experts with Turpin Communication (Chicago), offer a revolutionary approach that turns the old “Public Speaking 101” model on its head.

“Much of what’s taught about business presentations needs to be replaced,” says Ludwig. “Traditional methods focus on ‘speechmaking’ and the notion that presentations are like performances. That concept just doesn’t match the kind of presentations people actually give in the course of their work. Business presenters need a fundamentally different approach.”

That approach, say the authors, is one that shifts from “speechmaking” to thinking of business presentations as “orderly conversations” that thrive on the natural give-and-take between presenter and audience. Developed through Turpin Communication’s presentation workshops, Ludwig and Owen-Boger have seen this shift dramatically improve and empower their clients.

“Most presenters knew they weren’t delivering formal speeches, but the assumptions they were making and strategies they used didn’t reflect that,” says Owen-Boger. “Thinking of presentations as conversations changes everything: from preparation and delivery, through managing interactions, to how you judge your success when it’s all over.”

The Orderly Conversation takes readers through a clear and accessible process, inviting readers into one of the authors’ workshops to learn how to

  • Prepare for a genuine conversation
  • Engage listeners in a comfortable, flexible, conversation
  • Craft compelling visual aids that prepare you for the moment of delivery
  • Create the environment for productive interaction
  • Be clear and concise when thinking on your feet

“Most books on the subject stress how to look good speaking at people,” said Blaine Rada, professional speaker and management trainer named “America’s Greatest Thinker.” “’The Orderly Conversation’ shows how to truly connect with people, so you can stop performing and start engaging.”

Granville Circle Press calls their latest offering “eminently practical; real-world advice for the real world of business.” Due to be released in July 2014, The Orderly Conversation is available for pre-order.

ABOUT GRANVILLE CIRCLE PRESS
Granville Circle Press publishes works in the communication arts, including “Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference,” selected by Kirkus Reviews as a “Best of 2012.” The Orderly Conversation, ISBN 978-0-9838703-2-6 $21.95

ABOUT TURPIN COMMUNICATION
Turpin Communication (Chicago) was founded in 1992 to provide the best presentation and facilitation skills training available anywhere. Since then it has helped business presenters in a broad range of industries and organizations focus on the skills and techniques that help them succeed. Authors Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger are available for key note addresses and to speak at conferences and corporate meetings.

Contact

Kyle Carlson
Granville Circle Press
+1 612-229-8896
Email

Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger
Turpin Communication
773-239-2523
Email

This news release was originally published here.

What We Can Learn (and Not Learn) from Michael Bay

January 9, 2014 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Delivery, Introduction, Myths Debunked, News, Preparation, Presentation, The Orderly Conversation

You might have heard about the public speaking nightmare film director and producer Michael Bay experienced at the Consumer Electronics Show January 6.

A word of warning, though, if you’re sensitive to watching someone have a meltdown and walk off stage without delivering his message, prepare yourself. I found it really painful. And it’s only 80 seconds long.

The responses to this that I’ve read online have focused on Bay’s need to rehearse more, his over-reliance on the prompter, and the fight or flight instinct he followed. You can read an article by Nancy Duarte (of Slide:ology fame) and others’ responses here.

Be Careful, Business Presentations are not Speeches

As someone who works with business presenters, I think the responses to Bay’s situation are a great opportunity to reassert a distinction we always emphasize in our workshops—the distinction between speeches and presentations.

  • Don’t assume that what would have helped Bay will help you. Remember the presentations you deliver are not speeches. They are Orderly Conversations. As such, they require an entirely different approach. Bay was trying to deliver a scripted message that was intended to sound conversational, not really be a conversation. While extensive rehearsal may have helped him, it won’t help you. The presentations you deliver are far too unpredictable for that.
  • Bay’s performance is a good warning for people who believe in scripting or memorizing the beginning of a presentation. Your presentation’s introduction is an important time. During that first minute, it’s your job to bring the audience into the conversation by responding to them and the environment you share right now. This cannot happen when you’re scripted. Even if you can appear to make it happen (which requires acting skills), you will not be fully engaged in the moment. Because of that, it’s really difficult to respond appropriately to the unexpected.
  • Bay trusted the prompter and it failed him. You need to trust yourself. Managing the unexpected—something business presenters face all the time, speechmakers not so much—requires staying engaged and giving yourself time to think. I’m sure when Bay watched the video of his performance, he knew exactly where he went wrong and what he should have done instead. We see this happen all the time reviewing participant videos in our workshops. It’s easy to know, after the fact, what should have happened. So it’s not a matter of coming up with something new when you’re stressed. It’s a matter of settling your thoughts so you can tap into what you already know.

So while Bay’s performance is a cautionary tale for speechmakers, for business presenters it’s an excellent reminder that your first responsibility is to initiate a conversation with your audience. Once that conversation has begun, it’s easy to bring what you have prepared into it.

by Dale Ludwig, President & Founder of Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

Resolution Season: NEW Private Coaching Service

January 7, 2014 in News, Preparation, Presentation, Training

We hope your new year is off to a great start. One of our goals this year at Turpin is to make it easier for workshop participants to receive follow-up coaching when they need it most.

If you’ve been through one of our workshops, you know that our goal is to make presenting easier. We provide practical recommendations you can take back to work and use right away.

The challenge for you is applying what you’ve learned (1) in the variety of situations you face and (2) when you have a lot of other things to think about. This is especially true when you have an important presentation coming up.

Coaching for Your Next High-Stakes Presentation
To help you succeed when you can’t afford to mess up, we’re offering a new follow-up coaching service. Starting this year, for an additional fee, workshop participants will have the opportunity to sign up for a private coaching session after their workshop.

How Does It Work?

  • Coaching will be delivered virtually. No travel required.
  • The session will last an hour. Long enough to be productive, short enough to give you time to do other things that day.
  • You decide when your coaching session takes place and what it will focus on.
  • You know your coach already. Whenever possible, your coaching session will be with one of the instructors from your live workshop.
  • We’ll do our homework. Before the coaching session we’ll ask you to email your presentation to us. We’ll review it and prepare feedback before coaching takes place.
  • Immediately after coaching, we’ll email you a summary of the work we did.

Who’s It For?
Coaching is available for all workshop participants, no matter when your workshop was held.

How to Sign Up
Just contact Dana Peters for pricing information and to schedule a session.

We’re excited to offer this new level of support for our clients.

Self-awareness and Engagement

November 25, 2013 in Delivery, Greg Owen-Boger, Nervousness, Presentation

greg_owen-boger_hi-res_colorLast week we talked about “Beth,” a nervous presenter. Beth is a smart, articulate professional, but when it came to presenting she struggled and became self-conscious.

The first hurdle we had to jump was to settle her thoughts so that she could be in control. We did that through active pausing.

Beth was amazed at how such a simple thing could give her so much control over her ability to communicate clearly and confidently.

That’s great, but Beth also needs to be able TO DO IT, even when the stakes are high. That will require a new level of self-awareness (not self-consciousness) and engagement than what she’s used to.

“You need to be able to recognize – even when things are swirling out of control – that it’s happening. That level of awareness is critical in order for you to take control back,” I said.

In our workshops we talk a lot about being engaged in the conversation. Even when the stakes are high, we need to be as comfortable and in control as we are in everyday low-stakes situations. We need to be able to shift our focus outward, look around the room, take stock, think, and most importantly, we need to make a connection with the people we’re speaking with.

Rather than thinking, “How am I doing?” we need to think, “How are THEY doing?”

That requires eye contact. Not scanning the room. Not looking over their heads, but real solid make-a-connection eye contact so that you actually SEE them.

We’ve written about it many times, so I won’t go into a lot of detail here. Here’s a good primer on engagement: http://theorderlyconversation.com/wordpress/why-we-do-what-we-do-part-3-of-4/

The bottom line is that in order to be an effective presenter, one who is truly in control and fully aware of what’s going on around them, you need to be self-aware and engaged in the conversation taking place.

Easier said than done, for sure.

Let us know how we can help you.

By Greg Owen-Boger, VP at Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

My Mother’s Attic Part 3: The Elocutionists, a Cautionary Tale

July 16, 2013 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Delivery, Myths Debunked, Talent Development

Part 1, Part 2

This is the final article about the perils of business presenters following the same path as the elocutionary movement.

The great thing about The Ideal Orator is that its approach, from our twenty-first-century perspective, is completely over the top. Anyone reading this book today would recognize its unnatural exaggeration of delivery behaviors, its focus on how a message should be delivered apart from what that message is.

What the book helps us see, though, is something much more subtle. Whenever a prescriptive approach is applied to something as individual and spontaneous as business presentations, we run into trouble.

Here’s what I mean.

  1. The Orderly Conversation that should take place between you and your listeners becomes a performance. Performances are very controlled things. They are not driven by the connection between you and your audience. Instead, they are driven by the plan that was made in advance. When you perform, you take yourself out of the conversation.
  2. The search for the rules governing the presentation process is a perfectly understandable thing. Rules make things easier. The thing is, presenters need to discover their own rules, not follow the rules for someone else. The rules you follow are determined by who you are and the habits you’ve developed. When you follow rules that aren’t right for you, you will feel and look uncomfortable. Maybe not as uncomfortable as the kids in my mother’s elocution classes, but uncomfortable nevertheless.
  3. When business presenters deliver a performance or attempt to follow one-size-fits-all rules, they undercut their ability to make decisions in the moment. If you’ve participated in one of our workshops, you know that engaging listeners is one of the most important processes we work on. When you’re engaged everything you do is a response to what’s happening with your audience.

As you know, Turpin’s tag line is “Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.” So the next time you’re looking for rules governing delivery, make sure you’re focusing on what works for you, what helps you feel comfortable, and what gives you the control you need to manage the twists and turns of the Orderly Conversation.

by Dale Ludwig, President & Founder of Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

My Mother’s Attic Part 2: When the Rules Take Over

July 9, 2013 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Delivery, Myths Debunked, Presentation, Talent Development

Part 1, Part 3

As I mentioned in the first article on this topic, I stumbled upon an old elocution textbook among a pile of books that were about to be hauled away from my mother’s house. It was published in 1895, at the tail end of elocutionary movement’s popularity. While the movement began as a way to improve the delivery of lawyers and religious leaders, at this point it had evolved to focus on the performance of literary passages in schools.

My mother hated the classes she took in school because they required a very specific type of delivery, one based on following strict and, from her perspective and from ours, pretty silly rules. For example, there are rules for how shoulders should be used to express extreme joy or hate. Rules about communicating anger by clenching your fists. Elbows turned out indicates self-assertion. Here’s a passage describing how a performer should stand when “no particular emotion is expressed,” a sort of neutral position, I guess.

Stand with one foot a little in advance of the other with the weight of the body resting on the advanced foot, the left arm hanging easily at the side, and the right hand extended toward the audience, the first finger straight, and the others slightly curved, with the palm slightly exposed. (from The Ideal Orator and Manual of Elocution, John Wesley Hanson, Jr. and Lillian Woodward Gunckel, editors, pages 24 and 25)

As odd as all the rules in this book are, there’s something to be learned in the way they came about. The elocutionary movement began in the eighteenth century as a way to capture what was good about effective public speakers. The behaviors of great speakers were observed and these observations were turned into rules for everyone to follow.

The reason the original speakers were great was because there was a close connection between what they said and how they said it. As the rules developed, the natural connection between what and how was lost. All that remained were the rules, the shell of good delivery. That’s how in the early years of the twentieth century there were schoolchildren reciting poetry while worrying about whether their elbows were turned out or in.

The question we need to ask ourselves is how far have we really come from this approach? If we take away the archaic language of The Ideal Orator, and the fact that it focuses on the performance of literature, if we account for how the style of delivery has changed over the past century, aren’t we looking at a process still used in a lot of presentation skills training classrooms today?

How about when participants in our workshops ask us about the rules for gestures, where the “power position” is in the room, whether crossed arms are a bad thing, or how many seconds of eye contact are appropriate?

Aren’t they making the same assumptions made by the elocutionists? Aren’t they separating the what from the how?

In my next article, I’ll focus on the answers to these questions.

Part 1, Part 3

by Dale Ludwig, President & Founder of Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

Presentation Skills Training: REDEFINED. (Part 3 of 5)

February 20, 2013 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Delivery, Posts for Buyers, Presentation, Training

Part 1, Part 2, Part 4Part 5

This is the third in a series of five blog posts focusing on the distinction between the academic approach to public speaking and the skill-building approach business presenters need. My goal with this series is to talk about why the application of Public Speaking 101 approaches in the corporate training room fails to meet the needs of business presenters.

This post will focus on what are traditionally called “delivery skills.” These are the physical and vocal skills you use to communicate in every face-to-face interaction. If you approach your presentation as a performance instead of a conversation (as I discussed in my last post), your focus will be on how these skills look and sound to your audience. The success of a performance of a speech involves, for example, establishing eye contact with your audience to appear trustworthy, pausing to emphasize your points, controlling gestures to appear professional, and bringing enthusiasm to your voice.

What’s missing with that approach is consideration of what these skills do for you, the presenter. Let’s look at eye contact and pausing. During our workshops we talk about these skills as engagement skills. When they are used well, they help presenters relax, focus, and bring their listeners into the conversation.

The use of these skills, in other words, is about much more than simply how they make you look and sound. They are essential for the conversation. Through their application you are able to keep your thoughts and focus in the here and now. If you’re only thinking about how these skills appear to others, it takes you out of the moment and turns your focus inward. This weakens your connection to listeners and turns the conversation into a performance.

For most people, after you’re engaged in the conversation, your other delivery skills take care of themselves. Gestures occur naturally and vocal enthusiasm is appropriate and genuine. So rather than thinking of these skills as the polish you apply to performance, think of them as the welcome result of being engaged in the conversation.

In the next post I’ll talk about the need to bring real-life presentations into training.

Part 1, Part 2, Part 4Part 5

by Dale Ludwig, President and Trainer at Turpin Communication