Webinar Recording from PresentationXpert

June 23, 2015 in Delivery, Facilitation, Greg Owen-Boger, Meetings, News, Preparation, Presentation, The Orderly Conversation, Video, Virtual

PresentationXpertGreg Owen-Boger, Turpin Communication’s VP and Dale Ludwig’s co-author, was invited to talk about The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined as part of the PresentationXpert Webinar Wednesday series.

There were a lot of great questions asked during the session, and it’s becoming abundantly clear that there’s a huge need in the business world to improve efficiency and effectiveness of presentations, meetings, and training sessions.

Here’s what a few people had to say after the webinar:

“Amazing … I cannot thank you enough for the amazing and professional job you did in today’s webinar.”
Sharyn Fitzpatrick, Webinar Chick, Marcom Gurus

“Nice to see a pro in action.”
Dave Zielinski, Editor, PresentationXpert

View the recording from the June 17, 2015 webinar hosted by PresentationXpert.


About the Book

The Orderly Conversation is a groundbreaking resource for business presenters.

It offers a new approach to the getting-business-done presentations you deliver – an approach that’s more appropriate for the real world of business and more practical for every type of presenter and presentation.

The business presentations you deliver are not static or one-way. They are an exchange of information that have much more in common with informal conversations than formal speeches. They require a preparation process that looks ahead to the conversation that will take place and a delivery process that is flexible and responsive.

The authors’ goal with this book is to call out many traditional assumptions about what it takes to succeed and replace them with something better.

Virtual Presentations That Work

December 16, 2013 in Delivery, Presentation, Talent Development, Training, Video, Virtual

Breakthrough to Engage Clients and Staff

Greg Owen-Boger had the pleasure of presenting a webinar for the Training Magazine Network last week.

It was a great session full of lively chat from the engaged group.

Click the image to access the hour-long recording. (Note that you’ll need to register.)

Virtual Presentations that Work

Comments from attendees:

17 minutes in Barb said: “Already worth the price of admission… I like the ‘do it like it’s live’ idea!”

Bart said: “Really a lot of good ideas – great session. Glad I tuned in!”

Mary said: “This webinar… really good.”

Haley said: “Thanks so much, this was so helpful!”

Tracey said: “Nice job! Well explained concepts and good examples.”

Sandy said: “Wonderful information. I learned some great tips. Thanks so much!”

Virtual Presentations That Work

March 25, 2013 in Author, Delivery, Greg Owen-Boger, Preparation, Presentation, Talent Development, Training, Virtual

greg 200x300It’s one thing to be clear, concise, and in control of your message when you’re speaking to a group of people in a live conference room setting. It’s an entirely different thing to keep audience members attentive and engaged when presenting virtually.

It’s not just learning how to run the meeting software. That’s the easy part. The real issues are (1) getting people to want to participate and (2) communicating well using the technology so that what you say is actually heard and understood.

I led a webinar last week for CASRO, which is a professional organization serving the market research industry. In the session, we explore the skills and techniques it takes to communicate effectively in virtual settings no matter whether you’re conducting meetings, presentations, research results or video conferences.

Topics include:

  • Transferring face-to-face skills to the virtual environment
  • Engaging people you can’t see
  • Keeping people focused
  • Keeping things interesting
  • Developing visual aids for online delivery
  • Planning and executing interactions that people want to participate in
  • Using video conferencing tools
  • Pros and cons of muting attendee phones
  • Using tools such as polls, chat, hand raising and more
  • Using a host to manage the technology so that you can focus on content

What thoughts do you have about virtual delivery?

By Greg Owen-Boger, VP and Trainer at Turpin Communication

Impatient Learners

October 1, 2012 in Author, Delivery, Facilitation, Greg Owen-Boger, Preparation, Presentation, Training

greg 200x300If you’re a regular reader of our blog, you know that I often find inspiration in the Answers feature on LinkedIn. A while back, this question about impatient learners appeared.

Question: How do you deal with impatient participants during corporate training workshops?

As I think about this question, I’m reminded of an incident with a client several years ago where we were brought in mid-stream to try to rescue a particularly large training initiative.

Back Story
Leadership discovered that their employees lacked a basic understanding of what they actually did as an organization. To fix this, there was to be a big training push to educate everyone in the organization on the core elements of the business. To protect our client, I’ll call this initiative “Our Business 101.”

Each department was to develop a half-day session that would be delivered to the entire organization. They were to roll through the sessions roughly one a month until they had made it through the entire company. No matter your position, how long you’d been there, or what department you worked in, you would attend in person on the same day as everyone else. And, if you worked remotely, you’d dial in.

This was to be repeated annually.

Sounds like a good time, right?

Well, each department begrudgingly put its session together, assigned SMEs to speak and waited for their big day.

After a few months, we got a call from Leadership. The training wasn’t working. People were disengaged, the sessions were boring, and the initiative wasn’t doing what they had set out to do. Further, evaluations were bad. Real bad.

Leadership asked us to observe the next one and identify what they were doing wrong.

What we observed
The speakers demonstrated their expertise, but they were dull and long-winded. There was little connection between what they were saying and what was on their slides. They stood behind a podium and seldom looked up.

As I looked around the room at the learners that day, they seemed like naughty middle schoolers. The employees (who couldn’t find an excuse for not attending) did not participate. They passed notes, played games on their mobile devices, checked email. One even fell asleep. I wish I could say I was making this up.

It didn’t take long for us to understand what was happening. There were several issues that we uncovered. Here are the four biggies.

First, departments did not coordinate their efforts, which caused a lot of redundancy. Not knowing if contract negotiations fell under business development, finance, or legal, each department included it in their session. Brand integrity was discussed in the marketing session as well as legal. You get the idea.

Second, they did not stop to think about how much detail they really needed to go into. They were told to fill up half a day. So they did.

Third, Leadership was relying on SMEs to deliver training without giving them the training or resources they needed to be successful.

And fourth, there was no effort to engage the poor souls who had to dial in from remote locations. In many cases, they couldn’t see the slides or even hear the speakers because of the poor technology set-up in the training room.

The result was worse than not hitting the learning objectives. They gave training a black eye. I found this whole thing frustrating. It didn’t have to be this way. And think of the cost to the company both in money and employee engagement! I wish them luck getting these employees to participate in future training.

So now what?
At the point we were brought in there wasn’t much we could do other than work with each of the upcoming SMEs on the delivery of their presentations, which at that point had been locked down by Legal. That was OK and they did get something out of it, but we could have done more had the client brought us in earlier in the process.

Had they brought us in earlier we would have:

  • Consulted with them to coordinate among departments to avoid redundancy
  • Suggested smaller groups and worked with Leadership to split the employees into groups of similar backgrounds and interest levels
  • Suggested that remote attendees attend a webinar designed specifically for that purpose
  • Explored eLearning options (imagine how much time and energy this might have saved)

For the SMEs we would have:

  • Helped them tailor their session to the interest-level of each audience group
  • Consulted on their instructional design so that it facilitated learning more efficiently and effectively
  • Worked with them on their delivery skills to help them keep sessions relevant and interesting (I have written about this before.)
  • Helped them connect dots from previous sessions so that learners could get a better grasp of the organization as a whole rather than just the silos

So, next time you’re thinking about rolling out training, make sure you do it right. Think strategically. And if you need help, give us a call. We’ll be there to help you through the process; from instructional design consulting, to tailoring to each audience, to working on the training skills of your trainers and SMEs.

And if we can’t help, we’ll help you find someone who can.

By Greg Owen-Boger, VP and Trainer at Turpin Communication

Training and Presenting in a Virtual World: Turpin Communication’s Top 10 List of Best Practices (a Year in the Making)

December 22, 2010 in Author, Delivery, FAQs, Greg Owen-Boger, Training, Video, Virtual

greg 200x300As I look back at 2010 I realize that we spent a lot of time presenting and training in a virtual environment. We also produced a lot of training videos for ourselves, partners and clients.

For better or worse, it looks like webinars, video conferences and online training videos aren’t going away any time soon, so we might as well figure out how to present information effectively using them. All year my colleagues and I have been compiling some best practices. Here are 10 of them, 5 for presenting in a webinar format and 5 for using video conferencing.

Presenting Virtually

The biggest issue we see when it comes to presenting virtually is the challenge of keeping listeners engaged. Here are 5 suggestions.

  1. Create Compelling & Relevant Content
    I know this sounds obvious, but engaging participants in a virtual environment starts with your content. Too many times I’ve participated in webinars in which the speakers had nothing new or interesting to say. Participants in virtual events are a very (VERY) distracted bunch; don’t give them another reason to tune you out. Keep your content focused on their wants and needs, connect dots by reinforcing the application and relevance to their lives, and keep things concise.
  2. Do Not Read from a Script
    If people sense that you are scripted they’ll tune out very quickly. Instead, make it feel like a conversation. Each person should feel as if you’re speaking directly to him/her. Our recommendation for doing this is to have a second person in the room with you and speak directly to him/her. They will react, and when they do, you should respond accordingly just like you would in everyday conversation. Using this technique, your intonation will sound natural and interesting to virtual attendees.
  3. Include Multiple Speakers
    I’m more inclined to stay engaged when there is more than one speaker. It’s more interesting to listen to multiple voices with (perhaps) differing points of view. If you can include multiple speakers we recommend it. Just assign who will deliver what prior to going live.
  4. Being Interactive Does Not Equal Being Engaged
    Don’t confuse the “engagement tools” included in the event platform software with human engagement techniques. Using these tools does very little to engage people, but they do a lot to keep people active. So, think of the polling, hand-raising and chat features as “interaction” tools. The creators of these tools recommend using one every few minutes. That advice is silly and unhelpful. Do not use them just for the sake of using them. People are sophisticated and do not endure being hoodwinked for long. Instead (a) use one when it will genuinely help move things forward and (b) do your best to keep things relevant and engage your listeners in the conversation.
  5. Give Them Time
    When you use a poll or some other interaction tool, give participants time to complete the task. I find it irritating when presenters end a poll before I have time to thoughtfully respond. My recommendation is to set up the poll clearly and tell people how much time you’ll give them to respond. “You have 60 seconds to respond.” Then count it down for them. “30 seconds remain… 10 seconds… and the poll is now… closed.” This technique will give you the urgency you want so that people will participate, but still give them an appropriate window of time to complete the task.

There are, of course, other recommendations for conducting virtual sessions, but those are our top five.

Presenting Via Video

Now let’s discuss best practices for presenting using video. We’ve broken it down into two sub-groups: prerecorded video and synchronous video conferencing

Prerecorded Online Video (tutorials, eLearning, sales pitches, etc.)
While not an official part of our top 10 list, our thoughts for effectively recording a presentation on video are worth noting.

Earlier in the year we were contacted by Mike Grosso and David Tyner at KinetiCast. Their service allows sales people to create very quick video-based presentations that help move the sales process forward. They had seen some of our eLearning videos, and asked us to provide them with some how-to videos for their customers. Here’s a link to those how-to presentations using KinetiCast’s system. (You’ll be asked for your name and email. Don’t worry. We don’t sell anyone’s information.) While these how-to videos are focused on using the KinetiCast service (which we recommend by the way), the techniques for engaging viewers through the camera’s lens, being concise & listener-focused, and producing high-quality video on a budget can easily be transferred to other types of talking-head video creation.

Synchronous Video Conferencing
Video conferencing capability has come a long way, and it’s gaining momentum for becoming a standard delivery technique for meetings, presentations and training. Again, my colleagues and I have been compiling some best practices. Here are 5, which round out our Top 10 list for the year.

  1. Understand Lag and Synch Issues
    It’s important to understand that there may be some lag and that the video and audio may be out of synch. This causes people to unintentionally interrupt and trip over each other. Our recommendation is to be patient with others, and pause before speaking to ensure that the previous speaker was finished. This means that the conversations will be slower paced than face-to-face, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. When communicating via one-way radio, it’s common practice to say “over” when you’re done speaking. Perhaps you can implement an equivalent process? This may be particularly useful when there are more than two locations dialing in.
  2. Assign One Person to be the Moderator
    The moderator can be the host or someone else, but make it clear at the beginning of the video conference that this person is in charge. When the discussion gets going and people start tripping over each other, this person should step in and moderate.
  3. Pay Particular Attention to Your Eye Contact
    You should look into the camera’s lens when speaking, not at the person’s eyes as they are projected on the screen or monitor. When you look into the lens, the people you’re speaking to will feel as if you’re looking directly at them. If you look at their projection, you’ll appear as if you’re looking off into space as you speak. This is difficult to do, but once you master it this technique won’t feel so awkward.
  4. Adjust Your Lights
    To the degree possible, adjust lights in your room so that your face can be seen on video. In general you want more light in front of you shining on your face and less light behind you.
  5. Don’t Yell
    I’m not sure why people do this, but they tend to raise their voices when on a video conference. Speak in your normal tone and in the general direction of the microphone. Check in with people, especially at the beginning, to set or correct your volume level.

So there you have it: a year’s worth of best practices for presenting and training in a virtual world. Have thoughts of your own? We’d love to hear them.

From all of us at Turpin Communication, have a wonderful New Year.

by Greg Owen-Boger, VP and Trainer at Turpin Communication