Give the Gift of Better Business Communication This Year

November 23, 2015 in Dale Ludwig, Greg Owen-Boger, News, Posts for Buyers, The Orderly Conversation

Give the gift of The Orderly Conversation30% Off Your Entire Order

We’ve been told time and again: “I wish I’d had this book earlier in my career.”

So… no matter where your friends, family and co-workers are in their career, why not give them something they can really use?

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Offer expires Dec. 20, 2015

Don’t just take our word for it. Here’s what others have put in writing:

Where was this book when I was starting out?!?”
Pamela Meyer, Ph.D., Author, “From Workplace to Playspace: Innovating, Learning and Changing for Dynamic Engagement”

“I’m buying several copies for my colleagues.”
Nick Rosa, Managing Director, Sandbox Industries

“Spread the word, gentlemen. If I had my way, your text would be required reading in every business school in the land.”
Robert Lane, Director, Aspire Communications

“I wish I’d had this book earlier in my career.”
Blaine Rada, “America’s Greatest Thinker,” The Great American Think-Off

“You will use what you learn in The Orderly Conversation in the office, at home, and really anywhere the stakes are high and you need to get business done.”
Antonia Fico, Director, Performance Solutions, US Cellular

1 Website, 2 Interviews in India about The Orderly Conversation

October 18, 2015 in Dale Ludwig, Greg Owen-Boger, News, Posts for Buyers, The Orderly Conversation, Training, Uncategorized

indezine-logoThe Orderly Conversation is getting around. This time it’s in India where an online publication, Indezine, has interviewed co-authors Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger about the book and the writing process they followed.

We’d like to thank Geetesh Bajaj, editor at Indezine, for his insightful questions.

GeeteshGeetesh: Compared to other presenters’ books, The Orderly Conversation is a book that’s not so much about a sequential series of improvement steps one needs to take. Rather, your book is filled with your personal experiences — and it is these experiences that are valuable since they help others overcome so many problems. Can you share some thoughts about this observation?

dale_ludwig_hi-res_colorDale: You’re right, The Orderly Conversation grew out of our experience working with many different presenters with many different challenges. Over the years, we realized that there is no single path for improvement appropriate for everyone. “Rules” of delivery, for example, only work when the right “rule” is used to fill a very personal need. And everyone’s “rules” are slightly different.
Read the rest of Dale’s answer.

greg_owen_boger_300Greg: Over 40-plus combined years, Dale and I have worked with people from many different industries and at all levels within their organizations. There is one common theme among them. Through their business communications, they are attempting to get business done; they need to be clear and persuasive so that their listeners buy, agree, align, or learn. This also means that they need to create the conditions for a fruitful and efficient dialogue to take place.

Often the first objective (that of achieving the goal) is missed because of failure on the speaker’s part to manage the give-and-take process. We believe that this happens because business people are using the wrong set of tools to do that work.
Read the rest of Greg’s answer.

Geetesh: How did this book evolve – and what roles did you and your co-author play in its creation?

Dale: When I started writing, I was going to be the sole author. After I had written a few chapters, I showed them to Greg. (He and I have been delivering workshops together for about 20 years.) Greg’s response to the chapters was that they were theoretically sound, but did not focus enough on the practical application of the theory. To solve that problem, we decided we would share the writing responsibilities in a unique way. Greg would write about a fictional group of business presenters going through one of our workshops (people with very typical problems and strengths).
Read the rest of Dale’s answer.

Greg: Originally, I wasn’t going to contribute to the book at all. However, after reading an early draft, I suggested to Dale that it was lacking practical application. In other words, the theory was rock solid, but I doubted whether readers would be able to apply Dale’s recommendations to the variety of situations they face at work. I’m a huge fan of Patrick Lencioni’s book, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, in which he uses character and story to bring his leadership concepts to life. We decided to do the same, and since I have a background in theatre and storytelling, it made sense for me to take on this new concept and weave narrative into the text.

To do that, we created eight fictional, yet very real characters.
Read the rest of Greg’s answer.

[Tweet “The Orderly Conversation debuts in India. Thank You, Indezine and @Geetesh!”]

Introducing the New Workshop Catalog by Turpin Communication

September 1, 2015 in Greg Owen-Boger, News, Posts for Buyers, Presentation, Talent Development, The Orderly Conversation, Training

At Turpin Communication, we recognize the complexity and challenges of the work our clients do. Because of this, our workshops have always been highly tailored to the unique situations they face.

Now, we’ve made it easier for you to recognize how we can help you meet your business goals.

Workshop Catalog 2015The New Workshop Catalog

We’ve broken the new workshop catalog into three categories to match the type of speakers we work with: Business Presenters, Meeting Facilitators, and Trainers. Each of those categories is further broken down to focus on a specific type of speaker or business goal. For example:

Presentation Training for Sales Professionals focuses on the practical skills it takes to facilitate high-stakes sales situations.

Presenting to Leadership and Other Decision Makers provides foundation-level training to help participants speak clearly and concisely to time-crunched executives.

Does your team need to work on their executive presence? We’ve got you covered.

Do your managers have to collaborate with virtual teams? We have support for that too.

We also have workshops designed to help new and “accidental” trainers be more effective in the training room.

Learn More

This is only a sampling of the 28 newly designed and updated workshops we now offer. We invite you to take a peek at all of our workshop titles. Then give us a call so that we can tailor training to meet the exact needs of your team.

About Turpin Communication

Turpin Communication is a distinctly different presentation and facilitation skills training company, and we’re dedicated to helping people get business done.

If you’re familiar with our work, you know that we are guided by three principles:

  1. Presentations are less like speeches and more like Orderly Conversations.
  2. Our approach preserves every presenter’s personality and natural communication style. We call it: Find your focus. Be Yourself. Only better.
  3. Business presentations succeed on two levels: (1) was the goal met? And (2), did the speaker create the conditions for a fruitful conversation to take place?

More detail about our guiding principles and how they can be applied to your work can be found on the home page of Turpin Communication.

Three New Guiding Principles for Business Presenters

March 18, 2015 in Author, Delivery, Greg Owen-Boger, Meetings, News, Posts for Buyers, Presentation, The Orderly Conversation

presentationxpert 3-17-15
I was asked to write an exclusive for PresentationXpert.com, an online magazine devoted to helping people take their presentation skills to the next level. Here’s how they describe their mission:

We are a community of experts and practitioners dedicated to sharing the best, most practical information about developing and delivering face-to-face and online presentations. The ability to create and deliver persuasive presentations plays a crucial role in the career advancement and income levels of business people across disciplines.

Our mission is to help you take your presentation skills to the next level — and help your organization create a competitive edge in the process.

Hope you enjoy the article. An excerpt is below. Read the whole article here: http://www.presentationxpert.com/3-new-guiding-principles-for-business-presenters

Three New Guiding Principles for Business Presenters

greg_owen-boger_hi-res_colorBy Greg Owen-Boger

Think back to the most recent meeting or presentation that you led or participated in. Was it effective? Was it efficient?

If you’re like most business people I’ve asked, your response is a resounding “no.”

Imagine how much time, energy, money, and good will are squandered during inefficient meetings every day in conference rooms across the world. I’m not sure what kind of number to put on it, but I’m sure it would be a staggering amount.

If any other business process were this inefficient, we’d do anything in our power to fix it. But communication? Eh. It seems we’ve grown so accustomed to ineffective, time-wasting meetings and presentations that we simply allow them to happen.

It’s as if their inefficiency is simply the cost of doing business.

My colleagues and I think that the business world deserves something better.

Read more … http://www.presentationxpert.com/3-new-guiding-principles-for-business-presenters

New Book Redefines Presentations as Orderly Conversations

August 26, 2014 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Greg Owen-Boger, News, The Orderly Conversation

The Orderly Conversation is a groundbreaking book for business presenters who need to get business done.

(MINNEAPOLIS)

The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined, by Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger, is a book that promises to change the way business presenters think about the everyday presentations they deliver. The authors, communication experts with Turpin Communication (Chicago), offer a revolutionary approach that turns the old “Public Speaking 101” model on its head.

“The 101 model has been causing trouble for business people for years,” said Ludwig. He should know. He taught Public Speaking courses at the University of Illinois early in his career and has been working with business presenters since 1989.

“Traditional methods focus on ‘speechmaking.’ Speeches are a type of performance, something that can be rehearsed and perfected. Business presenters need something fundamentally different because delivering a speech will not help them close a complex deal, reach alignment with a team, or gather feedback on a broken process.”

What business presenters need, say the authors, is a new way to think about how they prepare for and deliver what they call “Orderly Conversations.” Developed through years as presentation trainers, this change in approach dramatically improves and empowers their clients’ communication skills.

“Most presenters knew they weren’t delivering formal speeches, but the assumptions they were making and strategies they used didn’t reflect that,” says Owen-Boger. “Thinking of presentations as conversations changes everything: from preparation and delivery, through managing interactions, to how you judge your success when it’s all over.” [Tweet ““Thinking of #presentations as #conversations changes everything.””]

Published July 15 of this year, The Orderly Conversation has already begun gaining momentum. “Spread the word, gentlemen. If I had my way, your text would be required reading in every business school in the land,” wrote Robert Lane, Director, Aspire Communications.

Granville Circle Press calls their latest offering “eminently practical; real-world advice for the real world of business.” The Orderly Conversation is available now at www.theorderlyconversation.com, amazon.com and other online book retailers.

ABOUT GRANVILLE CIRCLE PRESS

Granville Circle Press (Minneapolis) publishes works in the communication arts, including “Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference,” selected by Kirkus Reviews “Best of 2012.” info@granvillecirclepress.com [website link] The Orderly Conversation, ISBN 978-0-9838703-2-6 $21.95

ABOUT TURPIN COMMUNICATION

Turpin Communication (Chicago) was founded in 1992 to provide the best presentation and facilitation skills training available anywhere. Since then it has helped business presenters in a broad range of industries and organizations focus on the skills and techniques that help them succeed. Authors Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger are available for media interviews, keynote addresses, and to speak at conferences and corporate meetings. http://theorderlyconversation.com/wordpress/speaking/

Contact

Kyle Carlson
Granville Circle Press
+1 612-229-8896
Email

Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger
Turpin Communication
773-239-2523
Email

Why Redefine Business Presentations?

July 21, 2014 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Greg Owen-Boger, The Orderly Conversation

In all of our workshops, a certain amount of unlearning has always taken place.

Over time, we realized that everything we were helping presenters unlearn came from the world of speechmaking. Although presenters knew they were not delivering formal speeches, the assumptions they made and the strategies they used didn’t reflect that. They were simply working with the wrong tools, like using the handle of a screwdriver to pound a nail into the wall. If you worked at it long enough, you might be able to do it, but why bother when there’s a hammer in the toolbox?

We should stop calling these things presentations. We should call the conversations. That's really what they are.At some point, probably during a debrief after a workshop, one of us said, “Do you think we should just stop calling these things presentations altogether? Everyone gets hung up on that word. Wouldn’t it be easier to just call them conversations? That’s really what they are.”

So that’s what we did. We redefined business presentations as Orderly Conversations.

We brought the idea that business presentations were a type of conversation, not a type of speech, into our workshops. Soon, we realized we were heading toward a major overhaul. From preparation and delivery, through managing interaction, to how you judge your success when the presentation is over—all of these things are affected when you begin with the assumption that what you’re dealing with is a conversation.

To succeed, business presenters need to make these adjustments.

Instead of…

 

You should:

rehearsing for perfection  prepare to be flexible
following the rules of delivery  engage in a genuine conversation
following a one-size-fits-all approach  adapt to your Default Approach
keeping visuals in the background  bring them into the conversation
controlling group interactions  create the conditions for a fruitful discussion

The Orderly Conversation explores how each of these adjustments are made.

The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined is available now on this website and at Amazon and Itasca Books.

A New Definition of Success

June 30, 2014 in Delivery, Greg Owen-Boger, Nervousness, Presentation, The Orderly Conversation, Training

Why a Performance Approach to Business Presentations Doesn’t Work

greg_owen_boger_300Presentations should not be confused with speeches. Speeches are a type of performance. Presentations are a type of conversation. That’s why we’ve redefined them as “Orderly Conversations.”

Unfortunately, many people, even industry experts, hang on to the idea that a presentation should be “performed,” that it can be perfected by scripting, rehearsing, planning when and how to gesture, and following rules. These rules can be about all kinds of things, like the “right” number of bullets, never looking at your slides, holding your hands a certain way, or pausing for dramatic purposes.

As Dale Ludwig writes in chapter 5 of our new book The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined: “When rules like these are applied without consideration of their effectiveness or appropriateness for an individual, they stop being the means to an end and become the end themselves. This makes presenting more difficult for the presenter and less effective for the audience.”

Three Types of Performers
What we’ve seen is that business presenters who follow a performance approach generally fall into three categories:

  1. The Nervous Perfectionist
  2. The Dutiful Student
  3. The Entertainer

Let’s take a look at the negative consequences of each type of performer and offer up a better way forward.

The Nervous Perfectionist
In the book, we write about Jennifer, a Nervous Perfectionist. She puts an extraordinary amount of time into planning her presentation and rehearses it several times before the big day. Her goal is to perfect her delivery.

Unfortunately, during her last presentation, Jennifer felt like a failure because things didn’t go as she’d planned. Her solution was to rehearse more the next time.

Jennifer’s assumptions look like this:
A New Definition of Success pic 1 6-30-14

Dale writes: “As Jennifer moved through each of these steps, she assumed she was gradually taking control over the process. But it didn’t work. What happened to Jennifer actually looks like this.”
A New Definition of Success pic 2 6-30-14

Dale goes on: “As you can see, Jennifer’s nervousness led her to rehearse, which turned her presentation into a performance. This made her more self-conscious and more nervous. Her decision to rehearse more for the next presentation just repeats the cycle.”

The Dutiful Student, a New Definition of Success and a True Story
Another type of performance-focused presenter is what we call the Dutiful Student. Dutiful Students want rules they can follow. After all, their thinking goes, there must be a better and worse way to do something. Give me rules and I’ll follow them.

Last week in a workshop, we met Sandra (not her real name). She is a Subject Matter Expert and accidental trainer. Several times she asked, “What’s the rule for… “

As proof of her allegiance to the “prepare, prepare, prepare” rule, she pulled out a three ring binder containing her training slide deck. Each slide, complete with script in the speaker notes, was laminated for safekeeping.

We asked her how long it takes her to get ready to actually deliver the training. She said with a sigh, “Weeks and weeks. It’s far too time-consuming, and I have a lot of other responsibilities.” She was clearly frustrated by this.

When we asked her how she felt when learners asked questions, she said she hated it because it pulls her out of her script. “I have to think a lot when I’m up there. If they interrupt me it just throws me off.”

As the discussion went on, Sandra and her classmates agreed that her process is inefficient and didn’t create the conditions for fruitful learning. In Sandra’s attempt to follow rules and perfect the delivery of her training, she lost sight of her goal, which was to teach, to inspire learning.

Create the Conditions for a Fruitful Conversation
We worked with Sandra to help her create the conditions for a fruitful conversation. The first step was to turn her focus away from herself and toward her learners. She needed to get out of her head and actually speak with them.

During the first exercise in class, Sandra’s instruction was to introduce herself to the group and to engage them in a conversation about her job responsibilities. After several attempts, she finally settled into the conversation. She actually saw them and their reactions. She responded to them in the “here and now.” They asked questions, and Sandra answered them with ease.

This exercise was recorded on video. As she and I watched it a little later she said, “I forgot about thinking, and just did it! I just talked with them.” She was amazed that she could actually stand in front of the group and hold a conversation. She wasn’t thinking about her gestures, or even what to say. She was engaged in the here and now of the conversation, and it came naturally to her.

As we continued to talk, she made a connection that will stick with her well into the future. She said, “You know … as I think about it, I do my best teaching at the bar after my sessions. Now that I know why that is, I have a new definition of success!”

The Entertainer
In the book, we also talk about Sophia, an Entertainer. The character of Sophia was inspired by a young man (we’ll call him Calvin) that I worked with years ago. He was in sales and approached his sales presentations as if he were a comedian on a stage.

Calvin had a larger than life personality, a toothy smile, and a presentation style to go with it. I remember he swaggered to the front of the room and asked if we were ready. When we said yes, he snapped into action. It was as if the spotlight had just been turned on.

I remember that Calvin’s boss caught me in the hall that day and invited me into his office for a chat. As it turned out, Calvin’s job was on the line. His buyers weren’t buying, and none of his co-workers wanted to work with him. Calvin was over the top and perceived as phony. Not exactly the type of person most people want to work with or buy from.

So What Does This Mean for You?
Dale writes: “The lure of the performance approach is control; presenters use it because they assume success comes from planning exactly what they are going to say and how they will say it in advance of the presentation. This also means, their thinking goes, that success can be reached fairly easily because all they have to do is remember the plan and follow the rules. The danger is that exercising this level of control over the process pulls your focus away from the here and now of the conversation and leads, for many people, to increased nervousness and heightened self-consciousness.”

The more effective and efficient way to prepare for and deliver your presentations is to think of them as Orderly Conversations. Your role, then, is to prepare for and lead a listener-focused, flexible and responsive conversation. And when you do, it will make all the difference.

by Greg Owen-Boger, VP at Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

The Orderly Conversation is now available at Amazon.com

New Communication Guide Offers a Game-Changing Approach to Business Presentations

April 16, 2014 in Delivery, Facilitation, News, Preparation, Presentation, Talent Development, The Orderly Conversation, Training, Uncategorized

Granville Circle Press announces the July 2014 publication of “The Orderly Conversation,” a groundbreaking resource for business presenters.

News Release – PDF

PrintGranville Circle Press announced today the publication of “The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined” by Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger, a book that promises to change the way business presenters think about the “getting-business-done” presentations they deliver. The authors, communication experts with Turpin Communication (Chicago), offer a revolutionary approach that turns the old “Public Speaking 101” model on its head.

“Much of what’s taught about business presentations needs to be replaced,” says Ludwig. “Traditional methods focus on ‘speechmaking’ and the notion that presentations are like performances. That concept just doesn’t match the kind of presentations people actually give in the course of their work. Business presenters need a fundamentally different approach.”

That approach, say the authors, is one that shifts from “speechmaking” to thinking of business presentations as “orderly conversations” that thrive on the natural give-and-take between presenter and audience. Developed through Turpin Communication’s presentation workshops, Ludwig and Owen-Boger have seen this shift dramatically improve and empower their clients.

“Most presenters knew they weren’t delivering formal speeches, but the assumptions they were making and strategies they used didn’t reflect that,” says Owen-Boger. “Thinking of presentations as conversations changes everything: from preparation and delivery, through managing interactions, to how you judge your success when it’s all over.”

The Orderly Conversation takes readers through a clear and accessible process, inviting readers into one of the authors’ workshops to learn how to

  • Prepare for a genuine conversation
  • Engage listeners in a comfortable, flexible, conversation
  • Craft compelling visual aids that prepare you for the moment of delivery
  • Create the environment for productive interaction
  • Be clear and concise when thinking on your feet

“Most books on the subject stress how to look good speaking at people,” said Blaine Rada, professional speaker and management trainer named “America’s Greatest Thinker.” “’The Orderly Conversation’ shows how to truly connect with people, so you can stop performing and start engaging.”

Granville Circle Press calls their latest offering “eminently practical; real-world advice for the real world of business.” Due to be released in July 2014, The Orderly Conversation is available for pre-order.

ABOUT GRANVILLE CIRCLE PRESS
Granville Circle Press publishes works in the communication arts, including “Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference,” selected by Kirkus Reviews as a “Best of 2012.” The Orderly Conversation, ISBN 978-0-9838703-2-6 $21.95

ABOUT TURPIN COMMUNICATION
Turpin Communication (Chicago) was founded in 1992 to provide the best presentation and facilitation skills training available anywhere. Since then it has helped business presenters in a broad range of industries and organizations focus on the skills and techniques that help them succeed. Authors Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger are available for key note addresses and to speak at conferences and corporate meetings.

Contact

Kyle Carlson
Granville Circle Press
+1 612-229-8896
Email

Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger
Turpin Communication
773-239-2523
Email

This news release was originally published here.

“There’s No Soul in Perfection”

April 3, 2014 in Author, Delivery, Greg Owen-Boger, Myths Debunked, Video

american-idol-logoI’ll admit it. I watch American Idol. I suppose I have a little bit of … something… in my heart for those kids. I used to be a young performer. I dreamt of stardom too.

Now that I’m older and have worked that dream out of my system, I’m far more interested in the coaching the contestants receive than the performances themselves. Last night’s show, Season 13 – Top 8, was a coaching bonanza.

greg 200x300Harry Connick Jr’s advice to Sam was to make a connection, look at a single person (or the camera) and connect. He’s right about that. And it’s good advice for business presenters too. It’s not enough to say words, no matter how clear or persuasive (or pitch perfect) you are. You need to say them to someone. Make a connection. Make sure you’ve been heard and understood.

Immediately following Harry’s advice, Keith Urban told Sam, “There’s no soul in perfection.” He wants Sam to let loose, get a little dirty, rough it up. The same is true for business presenters.

[Tweet “”There is no soul in perfection” @KeithUrban #deep”]

We’ve posted a lot about the downside to striving for presentation perfection. It puts too much pressure on you and it takes you out of the moment. You can’t be “in” a conversation and reciting what you’ve rehearsed at the same time. It just doesn’t work. A presentation audience wants to feel as if the words are coming out of your mouth for the first time. They want to feel as if they can add to the conversation rather than observe as you talk.

That’s not to say that you shouldn’t be prepared. You should be. But you also need to react in the moment to what’s happening around you. Let the conversation get a little messy. Rough it up. Make a connection. That’s when the heart and soul of a business presentation shines.

Here are some other posts that talk about perfection, nervousness created by the desire for perfection, and the downside to practicing too much.

Practice Makes Perfect… or not.

Dealing with Presentation Nerves

 

Presentation Myth: I have been told to Practice Practice Practice. What do you think?

by Greg Owen-Boger, VP at Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

Book focuses on real (though fictional) business presenters

February 6, 2014 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Presentation, The Orderly Conversation, Training

dale_ludwig_hi-res_colorGreg and I are excited that soon The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined will no longer be a work in progress. It’s in the editor’s hands now. Just a few more months to go.

In this post I want to introduce you to one of the features of the book that really sets it apart from others on the market. One of the first decisions we made was that this book had to be as practical as we could make it. It had to focus on the nuanced application of the skills and techniques we were talking about. Barbara, our editor, calls this going beyond the “what” and the “how” to focus on the “why.”

To do that, we decided to create eight fictional business presenters, representing the wide range of businesses and individuals we work with. Through the course of The Orderly Conversation, readers will observe as these eight people, each from a different company, go through a Turpin two-day presentation skills workshop.

We also decided to keep our two voices separate. I am responsible for the sections focusing on how we’re redefining business presentations. Greg is responsible for talking about how the eight presenters respond to and apply those ideas.

Terry is one of eight presenters you'll follow in "The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined"

Here’s a quick introduction.

  • Terry is the new Director of IT at his company and needs to find ways to be concise, especially when speaking to senior executives.
  • Dorothy is in market research and presents to a wiggly group of internal sales people.
  • Michael sells energy bars and delivers seated presentations to distracted buyers.
  • Jennifer suffers from severe nervousness, and her new role requires monthly presentations.
  • James founded his business 30 years ago and is just now hearing that his presentations are disorganized.
  • Sophia has been training internal groups for years and doesn’t understand why her manager sent her to this class.
  • Luis is a young entrepreneur who needs guidance on his pitch to venture capitalists.
  • Elaine works for a real estate development company and presents sometimes-controversial plans at town hall meetings.

Jennifer is one of eight presenters you'll follow in "The Orderly Conversation: Business Presentations Redefined"As you can see, they are an interesting and diverse group.

  • If you suffer from nerves during your presentations, you’ll benefit from getting to know Jennifer and Terry.
  • If you’ve participated in a presentation training program that really didn’t help, you’ll appreciate what Luis and Sophia are going through.
  • If you sell across the desk in one-on-one situations, you’ll enjoy observing Michael’s progress.
  • If you’ve ever been surprised to learn that you’re hard to follow, you might sympathize with James.
  • Dorothy and Elaine have to learn to manage cranky or hostile audiences. If you do too, you’ll appreciate their frustration.

Greg will be writing more about all of our presenters in future blog posts.

by Dale Ludwig, President & Founder of Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”