Work the Virtual Room

March 14, 2014 in Author, Delivery, Greg Owen-Boger, Meetings, Virtual

To guard against sounding tired or uninspiring when leading a virtual session, I always recommend standing whenever possible. Being on your feet allows you to move around the room, keep your energy up and your voice bright.

As you can see in this photo, taken during a session I led for Training Magazine Network called Virtual Presentations that Work: Breakthrough to Engage Clients and Staff, I have the room set-up to help me stay on my toes during the session.

In the photo, you can see I’m wearing a phone headset and there are three computer screens. I’m logged in as a presenter on the laptop to my left. The big screen TV on the wall, which I look at most of the time, is projecting the same thing. The computer on the right is logged in as a participant, which gives me a sense of how much lag I’m dealing with.

The flipchart directly behind the laptop on the left is for my notes—used mostly to help me remember key information:Work the Virtual Room

  • The name of the session (yes, that’s something I might forget).
  • The names of my hosts.
  • A couple key phrases and leading questions, should I need them.
  • The time I need to be done.

You can also see that I have a hard copy of my presentation on the conference room table behind me. It’s there just in case something goes wrong with the technology and I have to wing it.

You may not have the luxury of a private room when presenting virtually, but I hope you’ll be able to borrow some ideas from this approach.

What ideas do you have for staying energetic and working the Virtual Room?

by Greg Owen-Boger, VP at Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

Video: A Core Competency for Learning Professionals?

April 23, 2013 in Author, Find Your Focus Video, Greg Owen-Boger, Talent Development

greg 200x300“Producing didactic video is a skill that will be as important as designing workbooks that aid learning.”

I love this quote. It’s the first sentence in an article by Jonathan Halls on the ASTD website. Halls is right. Video in eLearning isn’t going away; and, as learning and performance professionals, we need to get better at producing it.

The challenge is that video has been expensive and always seemed a little mysterious. When I’ve spoken at industry events about this topic, I’ve seen that there are a lot of learning professionals hungry for help. The good news is that a lot of the new technology available to us makes it easier to produce effective video on a limited budget. We just need to get comfortable using it.

If you’re new to video and need to plan, shoot, edit or be on camera, here are some resources for you.

What other ideas do you have about producing eLearning video?

By Greg Owen-Boger, VP at Turpin Communicationand co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

Virtual Presentations That Work

March 25, 2013 in Author, Delivery, Greg Owen-Boger, Preparation, Presentation, Talent Development, Training, Virtual

greg 200x300It’s one thing to be clear, concise, and in control of your message when you’re speaking to a group of people in a live conference room setting. It’s an entirely different thing to keep audience members attentive and engaged when presenting virtually.

It’s not just learning how to run the meeting software. That’s the easy part. The real issues are (1) getting people to want to participate and (2) communicating well using the technology so that what you say is actually heard and understood.

I led a webinar last week for CASRO, which is a professional organization serving the market research industry. In the session, we explore the skills and techniques it takes to communicate effectively in virtual settings no matter whether you’re conducting meetings, presentations, research results or video conferences.

Topics include:

  • Transferring face-to-face skills to the virtual environment
  • Engaging people you can’t see
  • Keeping people focused
  • Keeping things interesting
  • Developing visual aids for online delivery
  • Planning and executing interactions that people want to participate in
  • Using video conferencing tools
  • Pros and cons of muting attendee phones
  • Using tools such as polls, chat, hand raising and more
  • Using a host to manage the technology so that you can focus on content

What thoughts do you have about virtual delivery?

By Greg Owen-Boger, VP and Trainer at Turpin Communication