3 Smart Strategies for Conducting Meetings People Won’t Hate

February 2, 2015 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Delivery, Facilitation, Meetings

dale_ludwig_hi-res_colorI listened to a really interesting NPR story last week about workday meetings. It said that, “the average American office worker spends more than nine hours of every week preparing for, or attending, project update meetings.” That’s a lot of time. And the problem, as the story pointed out, is that most of these meetings last too long, they don’t accomplish much, and are run poorly. Much of the blame was placed on a lack of awareness among meeting facilitators.

So, if you run meetings, what are you to do? What should you be more aware of?

First, assume that the people you’re meeting with would rather be somewhere else … and that’s OK.

Don’t take it personally. People are busy, and meetings burn through a lot of time and energy. By making this assumption, you’re reminding yourself that it’s your job to keep things efficient and relevant for everyone. This might change the length of time you schedule the meeting for or the people you choose to invite.

Second, talk about the meeting process … not just the topic.

Talking about what’s going to happen and what is happening during the meeting will make it easier for everyone to engage and participate. Plus, you’ll sound like you know what you’re doing.

  1. Review your agenda when the meeting begins.
  2. State the goal of the meeting and—just as important—what you need from the group to reach that goal.
  3. When the meeting is over, clarify next steps and bring things to a close. Don’t rehash meeting content or bring in new information when everyone is ready to leave.

Third, stay on track or decide not to … either way, make it a choice.

  1. It’s easy to get bogged down in the minutia of meeting content, but, as the person running the meeting, keep things going in the right direction. When the group goes off on a tangent, think about whether the tangent is necessary to reach your goal. If so, let it happen. If not, rein them in. Question your gut reaction to the tangent. It may be leading you in the wrong direction.
  2. If you are the one wandering off track, though, stop it.

Remember, it’s your responsibility to communicate a sense of efficiency and relevance. When you do, you will create the conditions for a fruitful, efficient meeting.

by Dale Ludwig, President & Founder of Turpin Communication and co-author of the book, “The Orderly Conversation”

Why We Do What We Do (Part 4 of 4)

May 6, 2013 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Delivery, Facilitation, Posts for Buyers, Presentation, Training

A Discussion of Turpin Communication’s Core Principles:
The Presenter’s Role as Facilitator

Part 1Part 2, Part 3

Dale Ludwig, President & Founder of Turpin CommunicationThis is the fourth and final post focusing on Turpin’s core principles. In the first three I defined the Orderly Conversation, Default Approaches and what it means to be engaged in a genuine conversation. In this post I’ll talk about how delivering a presentation, regardless of its purpose or setting, requires the skills of a facilitator.

When we think of facilitation, most of us think of the discussions that take place in the training room, during problem-solving meetings, or brainstorming sessions. Facilitators in these situations are skilled at moving a group of people toward a specific goal. They help people understand new information, find solutions, and share insights. Their job is to (1) encourage the process to ensure a genuine conversation takes place and (2) control the conversation to keep it appropriately focused on the goal.

This isn’t easy, of course, because the first goal always competes with the second. When the conversation really gets going, the facilitator has to be astute enough to rein it in without stifling it altogether.

Facilitating Your Presentations

The same thing needs to happen during your presentations—even if you’re the person doing most of the talking. Your audience wants to feel they have the opportunity to participate, even if they choose not to take it. They also want to feel that you’re capable of managing the twists and turns of the conversation, even when they are the people pulling you off track.

Many presenters—especially those who are under the stress of nervousness, are new to their role, or feeling intimidated by the audience—are too controlling. Their focus on the orderly part of the process makes them appear uncomfortable, impatient, defensive, or domineering. They don’t trust the audience or the process enough to let the conversation breathe. Audiences sense this, of course, and pull away. Sometimes they simply shut down and wait for the presentation to be over. Sometimes their frustration leads to more open resistance.

The most successful presenters are those who understand that they can’t get the job done without the audience. They trust the group and the process to make a necessary, though not always easily managed, contribution. They know that without it, a genuine conversation never takes place.

So that wraps up my discussion of Turpin’s core principles. The common theme? By redefining business presentations as Orderly Conversations, the real-life challenges you face and the strategies you need to manage them come into sharper focus.

Part 1Part 2Part 3

by Dale Ludwig, President & Founder of Turpin Communication and co-author of the upcoming book, “The Orderly Conversation”

2013 Planning Your Training Initiatives

September 17, 2012 in Author, Dale Ludwig, Delivery, Facilitation, Greg Owen-Boger, News, Preparation, Presentation, Training

Is it really possible that summer’s over and that we’ll be heading into the 4th quarter in a couple weeks?

Wow.

If you’re like most of our clients, autumn is planning time for next year’s training initiatives. We thought we’d help you out and get the conversation started.

Here are some quick thoughts:

    • For the fourth year in a row, client-site workshop fees are staying the same in 2013.

  • We launched Find Your Focus Video. As you probably know, we have become pretty good at creating eLearning videos. Now we’re offering video production and consulting services to our clients who work in the eLearning field. This is no ordinary production service, though. What sets us apart is our on-camera coaching. If you’ve ever had to be on-camera, you know how challenging it can be. We’ll take the mystery out of it for you. Learn more here.
  • Last year we developed a more robust workshop catalog to better serve our clients. While sessions are always tailored to meet each group’s needs, we’ve made it easier to envision what your sessions might look like.  Think of these descriptions as the starting point for tailoring conversations.

Here are the workshop titles and links to their full descriptions.

Mastering Your Presentations
No-nonsense strategies for presenting and facilitating in today’s business environment

Presentation Training for Sales Professionals
Practical skills for facilitating your sales conversations

Speaking with Confidence & Clarity
Fundamental skills for the nervous or novice presenter

Presenting Globally
Getting your message across the cultural gap

Narrative Presentations
Using stories to capture and motivate your audience

Presenting & Training in a Virtual Environment
Adapting your face-to-face skills to the online world

Presentation & Facilitation Skills Training for Trainers
No-nonsense techniques for engaging today’s learners

Advanced Meeting Facilitation
Strategies for encouraging participation while controlling the process

Running Effective Meetings
Fundamental skills for beginners

  • We continue to offer public workshops. We have two-day mastery-level workshops and one-day novice-level workshops. These are excellent options for when you don’t have enough people to fill up a class of your own. Click here for details and schedule.
  • Budget and travel continue to be an obstacle for many. If this is the case for you, check out our eLearning options. Single and multi-user licenses are available

We think that covers the highlights. We look forward to 2013 and helping your presenters and facilitators find their focus, be themselves, only better.

Sincerely,

Dale & Greg
773-455-8855
773-239-2523

by Dale Ludwig, President and Trainer, and Greg Owen-Boger, VP and Trainer, at Turpin Communication