Impatient Learners

October 1, 2012 in Author, Delivery, Facilitation, Greg Owen-Boger, Preparation, Presentation, Training

greg 200x300If you’re a regular reader of our blog, you know that I often find inspiration in the Answers feature on LinkedIn. A while back, this question about impatient learners appeared.

Question: How do you deal with impatient participants during corporate training workshops?

As I think about this question, I’m reminded of an incident with a client several years ago where we were brought in mid-stream to try to rescue a particularly large training initiative.

Back Story
Leadership discovered that their employees lacked a basic understanding of what they actually did as an organization. To fix this, there was to be a big training push to educate everyone in the organization on the core elements of the business. To protect our client, I’ll call this initiative “Our Business 101.”

Each department was to develop a half-day session that would be delivered to the entire organization. They were to roll through the sessions roughly one a month until they had made it through the entire company. No matter your position, how long you’d been there, or what department you worked in, you would attend in person on the same day as everyone else. And, if you worked remotely, you’d dial in.

This was to be repeated annually.

Sounds like a good time, right?

Well, each department begrudgingly put its session together, assigned SMEs to speak and waited for their big day.

After a few months, we got a call from Leadership. The training wasn’t working. People were disengaged, the sessions were boring, and the initiative wasn’t doing what they had set out to do. Further, evaluations were bad. Real bad.

Leadership asked us to observe the next one and identify what they were doing wrong.

What we observed
The speakers demonstrated their expertise, but they were dull and long-winded. There was little connection between what they were saying and what was on their slides. They stood behind a podium and seldom looked up.

As I looked around the room at the learners that day, they seemed like naughty middle schoolers. The employees (who couldn’t find an excuse for not attending) did not participate. They passed notes, played games on their mobile devices, checked email. One even fell asleep. I wish I could say I was making this up.

It didn’t take long for us to understand what was happening. There were several issues that we uncovered. Here are the four biggies.

First, departments did not coordinate their efforts, which caused a lot of redundancy. Not knowing if contract negotiations fell under business development, finance, or legal, each department included it in their session. Brand integrity was discussed in the marketing session as well as legal. You get the idea.

Second, they did not stop to think about how much detail they really needed to go into. They were told to fill up half a day. So they did.

Third, Leadership was relying on SMEs to deliver training without giving them the training or resources they needed to be successful.

And fourth, there was no effort to engage the poor souls who had to dial in from remote locations. In many cases, they couldn’t see the slides or even hear the speakers because of the poor technology set-up in the training room.

The result was worse than not hitting the learning objectives. They gave training a black eye. I found this whole thing frustrating. It didn’t have to be this way. And think of the cost to the company both in money and employee engagement! I wish them luck getting these employees to participate in future training.

So now what?
At the point we were brought in there wasn’t much we could do other than work with each of the upcoming SMEs on the delivery of their presentations, which at that point had been locked down by Legal. That was OK and they did get something out of it, but we could have done more had the client brought us in earlier in the process.

Had they brought us in earlier we would have:

  • Consulted with them to coordinate among departments to avoid redundancy
  • Suggested smaller groups and worked with Leadership to split the employees into groups of similar backgrounds and interest levels
  • Suggested that remote attendees attend a webinar designed specifically for that purpose
  • Explored eLearning options (imagine how much time and energy this might have saved)

For the SMEs we would have:

  • Helped them tailor their session to the interest-level of each audience group
  • Consulted on their instructional design so that it facilitated learning more efficiently and effectively
  • Worked with them on their delivery skills to help them keep sessions relevant and interesting (I have written about this before.)
  • Helped them connect dots from previous sessions so that learners could get a better grasp of the organization as a whole rather than just the silos

So, next time you’re thinking about rolling out training, make sure you do it right. Think strategically. And if you need help, give us a call. We’ll be there to help you through the process; from instructional design consulting, to tailoring to each audience, to working on the training skills of your trainers and SMEs.

And if we can’t help, we’ll help you find someone who can.

By Greg Owen-Boger, VP and Trainer at Turpin Communication

Practice Makes Perfect… or not.

September 4, 2012 in Delivery, Greg Owen-Boger, Myths Debunked, Nervousness, Preparation, Presentation

 

greg 200x300A lot of people will tell you to “practice, practice, practice” because “practice makes perfect.”

When it comes to presenting, this is some of the worst advice you can get or give.

Practicing a presentation cannot possibly lead to perfection.

Here’s why.

Effective presentations are not speeches (which I suppose could be perfected). They are conversations. Conversations by their very nature are imperfect. They involve other people and are therefore unpredictable. They twist and turn. They stop and start. They go back on themselves. They jump forward.

You can’t predict any of that. Therefore, practicing a presentation until it is perfected is a foolish exercise.

The desire to be perfect and the pressure of other people telling you that you can be (should be) perfect puts the bar too high. And here’s what happens:

  • You put too much energy into reaching the bar,
  • which leads to nervousness,
  • which disengages you,
  • which puts you in your head trying to recreate the script you etched into your brain during practice,
  • which leads to a dull, lifeless, uninspiring meeting.

Hardly perfect.

It’s more than bad advice, though, it causes damage.
Strong words, I know. But I’ve worked with enough presenters to know that they drag around a lot of baggage from the bad advice and training they’ve received over the years. A lot of my job when coaching them is to undo the damage. I help people see things in a new way and I give them a new set of skills and techniques that will work uniquely for them.

If I were your coach
If we had the chance to work together, I’d start by asking you to redefine your next presentation as an Orderly Conversation. An Orderly Conversation is one that is carefully organized and flexibly executed.

When you think of presentations as Orderly Conversations, it changes how you think of (and use) your slides. They become thought starters that will trigger dialogue. They become support for the conversation rather than being the presentation. This new thinking will change the information you put on your slides and how you arrange it.

Let’s assume that your slides are complete and you feel that they will support the conversation you want to have. Now it’s time to review. Notice I said “review,” not practice. As you review your slides, look at each and grab a thought. That thought should launch the conversation you intended. If not, change it until it does.

As you think through each slide, avoid scripting yourself. Think of different ways of explaining each slide. Remember you’re not striving for perfection. You’re working toward flexibility.

Once the conversation begins, let loose and enjoy it. Trust that your slides will be there to support the conversation. Let it get a little messy, follow your listeners’ lead for a bit, bring it back around. You’ll be amazed at how much more fun presenting can be.

By Greg Owen-Boger, VP and Trainer at Turpin Communication